Konferenz “This Town Is Gonna Blow…” European Protest Movements and Society in the 1980s

Your ads will be inserted here by

Easy Plugin for AdSense.

Please go to the plugin admin page to
Paste your ad code OR
Suppress this ad slot.

http://thistownisgonnablow.jimdo.com

May 6-8, 2010: Thirty years after the Bremen “Bundeswehrkrawalle” European protest movements of the 1980s will be the subject of an international academic conference

On May 6th 1980, a group of new recruits was publicly sworn in with the German Bundeswehr in the Bremen soccer stadium. As a reaction, street battles of hitherto unknown dimensions between left-wing activists and (military) police took place in the area near the stadium. Viewed in the following years as the beginning of the German autonomous movement, this inner city riot marked at the same time a European phenomenon.

A week earlier the coronation day of the Dutch Queen Beatrix had seen the squatting of several houses and the building of barricades in the city of Amsterdam; at the end of May the so-called Opernhauskrawalle shook the city of Zurich; race riots worried the British public shortly thereafter.

The Bremen Bundeswehrkrawalle seem to have been part of a newly forming protest movement which was characterized by militancy and an attitude of non-cooperation, a concern for urban spatial politics, and its interpretation as a youth phenomenon.

In the states of the Warsaw Pact important protest movements existed as well – from Polish Solidarnosc to the East German peace movement – while the political conditions differed significantly. And while Western consumer goods became the object of desire of many critics of the “actually existing socialism”, a growing “alternative” milieu in the West formulated a fundamental critique of consumption.

Thirty years after the Bremen Bundeswehrkrawalle an international academic conference will explore these new protest movements. It will explore questions of identity and consumption, of the significance of the media, transnationalism and urban space for these newly formed protest movements. It further aims to situate these movements in their overall context of beginning neoliberalism, conservative turn, and the so called “Second Cold War”.

The conference takes place at the Gästehaus der Universität Bremen, Auf dem Teerhof 58. All presentations will be held in English.

A public panel discussion on the Bundeswehrkrawalle (in German) will take place on May 7, 2010, 7:30 p.m. at the Kulturzentrum Schlachthof. It will be followed by a screening of the film “Züri brännt” (CH 1980).

STUDY DAY: Cold War Cities

Your ads will be inserted here by

Easy Plugin for AdSense.

Please go to the plugin admin page to
Paste your ad code OR
Suppress this ad slot.

The Cold War

Venue: Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies, University of London

CONFERENCE: Art Histories, Cultural Studies and the Cold War, 24 September 2010

Keynote Speaker: Miranda Carter (author of Anthony Blunt: His Lives, 2001)

To register for the conference please email G.F.Pooke@kent.ac.uk or B.D.H.Thomas@kent.ac.uk

STUDY DAY: Cold War Cities, 25 September 2010

Programme

Register here for the Study Day

Twenty years ago the world witnessed the most momentous geo-political changes since the end of the Second World War: the fall of the Berlin Wall, the implosion of the Soviet Union and the emergence of the USA as the global superpower. The period of the Cold War (c.1948-89) was one of ideological struggle and profound cultural crisis, no less so than for the discipline of Art History, rooted in the ideals and aspirations of  the European Enlightenment. But the crucible of the Cold War also witnessed the re-definition of Art History, the birth of the New Left and a nascent tradition of Cultural Studies.

In 1952 Erwin Panofsky wrote a paper surveying Three Decades of Art History in the United States – an essay pervaded by an acute sense of how the development of the discipline of Art History, and the lives of individual art historians, had been shaped by the momentous political events of the 1930s and 40s. In a specific reference to McCarthyism, Panofsky noted how nationalism and intolerance’ remained a terrifying threat to academic freedom and that ‘even when dealing with the remote past, the historian cannot be entirely objective.’ Although the situation was less extreme in the UK, intellectuals and academics with left wing sympathies such as Frederick (Frigyes) Antal, Francis Klingender and Eric Hobsbawm still faced ‘red baiting’ and other challenges in gaining employment in universities and other teaching-related posts.

Writing in 1960 to Adrian Stokes about his book Art and Illusion, Ernst Gombrich reflected on the ‘considerable shock’ with which he discovered that Art History had been misused to propagate pseudo-historical myths on both the Right and the Left. Some decades later Peter Fuller was faced with a changing political landscape and the need to re-consider his own response to national identity and to the Marxism he had cherished earlier in his career.

The conference on Friday 24 September, organized by the department of History & Philosophy of Art at the University of Kent, aims to explore how the Cold War delineated approaches to Art History, Historiography and Cultural Studies and how its conditions and constraints shaped the professional careers and influenced the writings and ideas of scholars and cultural theorists.

The related study day on Saturday 25 September, organized by the Centre for the Study of Cultural Memory (CCM) at the Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies, will explore Cold War Cities. This includes papers from a variety of angles and disciplines, including history, art history, film, architecture, politics, memory and cultural studies.

For more info on the Art Histories Conference please contact G.F.Pooke@kent.ac.uk or B.D.H.Thomas@kent.ac.uk; For more info on the Cold War Cities Study Day please contact katia.pizzi@sas.ac.uk.

Cityscapes in History: Creating the Urban Experience

Your ads will be inserted here by

Easy Plugin for AdSense.

Please go to the plugin admin page to
Paste your ad code OR
Suppress this ad slot.

International conference organized by Dr. Katrina Gulliver and Dr. Helena Toth (LMU Research Fellows) Language: English 29.07.2010 – 30.07.2010

In this conference early stage researchers are brought together tracking new basic approaches in the research field of urban history. Separate sections will focus on historical and local questions as well as on topics like “Cities and the Marginalized”, “Imagining the City”, “Cities and Transformation” or “Civic Identity”.

Evening lecture on July 29th at 6 p.m. c.t.: Prof. Dr. Lizabeth Cohen
Thinking about Cities across Disciplines: An American Historian Explores Architecture and Planning to Probe the Urban Built Environment

Lizabeth Cohen is professor for American studies and is currently the head of the history department of Harvard University.

Participation is free. If you are interested in participating please contact us: E-Mail schicken an info@cas.lmu.de E-Mail

RELATED LINKS: